Category Archives: Food Science Project Topics

Food Science Project Topics

THE PHYSICO-CHEMICAL AND ANTIOXIDANT PROPERTIES OF CULINARY HERBS AND LOCAL SPIES PIPE GUIEENSE (UZIZA) XYLPIA AETHPICA (UDA) MONODORA MYRISTICA (EHURU) TETRAPELURA TETRAPTERA (OSHOSHO)

THE PHYSIO-CHEMICAL AND ANTIOXIDANT PROPERTIES OF CULINARY HERBS AND LOCAL SPIES PIPE GUIEENSE (UZIZA) XYLPIA AETHPICA (UDA) MONODORA MYRISTICA (EHURU) TETRAPELURA TETRAPTERA (OSHOSHO)

CHAPTER ONE

1.0     Introduction                                                                                      1

1.1     Objective of the Project                                                           6

CHAPTER TWO

2.0     Literature Review                                                                              7

2.1     The Natural Heal Perspective of Culinary Herbs and Spice    8

2.2     Morphology and Description of Some

Particular Culinary Herbs and Spices                                               11

2.3     Chemical Constituents of Culinary Herbs and Spices             16

2.4     The Essential Roles of Culinary Herbs and Spices                           25

2.5     Essential Oils                                                                          28

2.6     Oleoresins                                                                               30

2.7     Advantages of Oleoresins Over Convectional Spices and Herbs      31

2.8     Oleoresin Manufacture                                                            34

2.9     Relative Flavour Strength of Some Spices                              34

2.10   Autoxidation                                                                           35

2.11   Lipid Deterioration                                                                  36

2.12   Control of Oxidation                                                               39

2.13   Mechanisms of Antioxidant                                                    40

CHAPTER THREE

3.0     Materials and Methods                                                            42

3.1     Sample Collection and Storage Prior to use                                      42

3.2     The Equipments Used                                                             42

3.3     The Reagents Used                                                                  43

3.4     Methods of Materials Preparation                                           44

3.5     Proximate Analysis                                                                 45

3.6     Extraction of Oleoresins                                                                   51

3.7     Samples Preparation                                                               52

3.8     Peroxide Value Determination                                                          53

  1. Thiobarturic Acid Value Determinations 54

CHAPTER FOUR                          

4.0     Results and Discussion on the Spices                                               56

4.1     Result of Proximate Analysis on the Spices                                     56

4.2     Result of Peroxide Value and Thiobarbituric Acid Value       57

CHAPTER FIVE

5.0     Conclusion and Recommendation                                           61

5.1     Conclusion                                                                              61

5.2     Recommendation                                                                     62

References                                                                               63

Appendix I                                                                              65

Appendix ii                                                                                       71

Abstract

a comparative study was done on the physico-chemical and antioxidant properties of some culinary herbs and local spices. Piper Guiness (Uziza), Xylopia aethopica (Uda), Monodora Myristica (Ehuru) and Trtraleura Tetraopera (Oshsho).  The proximate analysis of these spices  were done to determine their moisture content, ash content, crude fat crude fibre and protein content. Extraction of the Oleorasin from the spices and soybean oil were done using soxhlet extraction unit with hexane as solvent. Imi of each of the Oleorasin samples of the spices was pipette into 100ml of soybean oil into four different test tubes labeled A,B, C and D. sample E contains 100ml of soybean oil with 150ppm of Butylated Hydroxyl toluene while the untreated soybean oil (sample F) was used as the control. The test-tube were shaked, plugged with cottonwood and kept at room temperature in a rack. The peroxide value of the sample were monitored for tightly for eight weeks, the thiobarbituric acid 9TBA) value were also determined on the tenth and twelfth weeks respectively. The peroxide value of the sample for the eighth week were recorded as follows: A (10), B (8) C (8), D (11), E (10) and F (22) respectively. From these results, it shows that all the spices were below the range of detectable rancidity. (i.e. between 20 to 40m Eg/kg). the thiobarbituric aid (TBA) value were recorded, for the twelfth week as follows: A  (0.033), B (0.005),  C (0.004), D (0.046), E (0.776) and F (2.503) respectively. Sample C Monodora Myristica (Ehuru) had the lowest Pv and TBA value, thus the best species with antioxidant property. When compared with other spices and even the artificial antioxidant, followed by sample B Xylopia aethiopica.

 

 


CHAPTER ONE

 

1.0     INTRODUCTION

Herbs and spices have long been used by ancient civilsations for culinary, medicinal and cosmetic uses. With modernization and the development of patent medicines, the use of natural cures and elixirs decrease in popularity.

Nowadays, disillusionment with synthetic drugs, artificial additives and their possible sides effects has given great rise in popularity to many natural products, be it for culinary, medical or cosmetics purposes. In line with the world wide trend for eco-consciousness, the popularity of natural cosmetic purposes. In line with the world wide trend for eco-consciousness, the popularity of natural cosmetic products, such as those sold in red earth and the body shop, attests to the current trend (Broadhurt CL, 2000).

Spices are defined as those aromatic plants and their parts, fresh or dried, whole or ground, that are primarily used to impart flavour and fragrances to foods and drink (Prosea 1986). The term is used in a wide sense and includes the culinary herbs. Spices are indispensable in the culinary art, used to create dishes that reflect the history, the culture and the geography of a country. Well-known examples are  curry powder, housing live five spices powder) Pizza herbs and fines herbs (Polansky mm, 2000) spices oils and spice oleoresins are also indispensable in the food and beverages manufacturing industry, the perfumery and cosmetic industry and the pharmaceutical industry. Some spices and derivative possess antioxidant and antibiotic properties, which has increased interest in the commercial exploitation of aromatic plants for food preservation and crop protection with the growing demand natural and organic products and the increasing clamour to dispense with synthetic flavours and artificial food colouring, the future for spices seems bright.

According to Pearson 1976 herbs and spices consist of the dried leaves, flowers, buds fruits, seeds, bark or rhizomes of various plants. They are incorporated in foods only in small amounts but they make important contributions towards the odour and flavour due to the presence of the volatile oil 9essentail oil) and fixed oil, local examples include Piper guineense  (Uzuza), Xylopia gethiopica  (uda), Mondora myristica (Ehuru, Tretaphleura tetraptra  (Oshsho) and capsicum frutescens (Ose Nsukka).

An antioxidant is defined as any substance which is capable of delaying, retarding or preventing the development in food of rancidity or other flavour deterioration due to oxidation,. Antioxidant are only one means of fending packing or there are others such as vacuum packaging or packing under an inert gas to exclude oxygen and refrigeration, freezing, both of which greatly reduce the rate of authorization. Furthermore, it is seldom realized how little oxygen is need to initiate and maintain the oxidation process or how difficult and expensive it can be to remove the last traces of air from a product.  For these reasons it is quite common to combine the use of antioxidants with inert gas packing using an antioxidant should be seen as one of several measures available, but used properly, it is generally effective, easily applied and inexpensive.

The prime justification for using an antioxidant is one of need an antioxidant can extend the shelf-life of a food, reducing wastage and complaints, it can reduce nutritional losses (oil soluble vitamins, such as vitamin A, are  prone to oxidation)) and a very important point for the food technologist, it can widen the range of fat which can be used.  Using an antioxidant enables the food manufacturer to smooth out differences in the stability of fats/oils and renders the food product less specific in terms of ingredient requirements. This offers more scope for cost control without jeopardizing the product quality of shelf-life,  without an effective antioxidant, lard for instance, would find far fewer uses.

Antioxidants serve two principle functions.

  1. They break the oxidation chain by containing the free radicals or acting as hydrogen donor.
  2. They direct the breakdown of peroxides into stable substances that do not promote further oxidation (Ihekornye and Ngoddy 1985).

An ideal antioxidant meets the following demands:

  1. Safe in use.
  2. Should impart no odour, flavour or colour.
  3. Effective of low concentration.
  4. Should be easy to incorporate
  5. Should survive cooking process.
  6. Should be available at now cost-in-use.

(Allen and Haninlton, 1989), John and Peterson, (1974), summarized the general used and properties of herbs and spices as the ability to:-

  1. Give flavour to a flavourable base.
  2. Impart a different flavour character to the basic product.
  3. Disguise objectionable intrinsic flavour and boost intrinsic flavour which would otherwise be too weak.

According to Ikekornye and Ngoddy, (1985) the effectiveness and optimal utilization of a spice for its various uses depends on certain factors such as method of growing, harvesting sorting, storage and ultimately processing techniques.

Traditionally, spices are sued to prepared food for nursing mothers, it is believed to be very useful in cleaning the uteral lining after child birth. It is believed to have contract the womb to its normal size after birth. It is used in preparing native concoction for the treatment of convulsion and “jedi-jedi” in infant, a diseases which gives rise to greenish stool, stomach upset and inflamed.  It is generally used in treating some minor ailment such as stomach upset, headaches, malaria, bronchitis and many others (Uba, 1997).

 

1.1     OBJECTIVES OF THE PROJECT

Herbs and spices are known to be incorporated in food only in small amounts but they make important contributions towards the odour and flavour due to the presence of the volatile oil (essential oil) and fixed oil and little or on work has been done on most local culinary herbs and spices. The aim of this project is to extract these oleoresin and essential oils in herbs and spices that impart flavours and fragrances present for the manufacture of foods, beverages, perfumery, cosmetics and pharmaceutical products, and to determine the antioxidant properties of these local spices and herbs for food products, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals.

Download our android mobile app for more materials

ORDER NOW

COMPLETE MATERIAL  COST  N2,500 Or $10.  FRESH  PROJECT MATERIAL  COST 50,000 NAIRA FOR UNDERGRADUATE, OTHERS 100,000 -200,000 NAIRA.

THE NATURE AND CONSEQUENCES OF JUVENILE DELINQUENCY IN NIGERIA: A STUDY OF ENUGU NORTH LGA, ENUGU STATE

MAKE YOUR PAYMENT  INTO ANY OF THE FOLLOWING BANKS:
 GTBANK
Account Name : Host Link Global Services Ltd
ACCOUNT NUMBER: 0138924237
First Bank:
Account Name: Chi E-Concept Int’l
Account Name: 3059320631

Foreign Transaction For Dollars Payment :
Bank Name: GTBank
Branch Location: Enugu State,Nigeria.
Account Name: Chi E-Concept Int’l
 Account Number:  0117780667. 
Swift Code: GTBINGLA 
Dollar conversion rate for Naira is 175 per dollar. 

ATM CARD:  YOU CAN ALSO MAKE PAYMENT USING YOUR ATM CARD OR ONLINE TRANSFER. PLEASE CONTACT YOUR BANK SECURITY FOR GUIDE ON HOW TO TRANSFER MONEY TO OTHER BANKS USING YOUR ATM CARD. ATM CARD OR ONLINE BANK TRANSFER IS FASTER FOR QUICK DELIVERY TO YOUR EMAIL . OUR MARKETER WILL RESPOND TO YOU ANY TIME OF THE DAY. WE SUPPORT CBN CASHLESS SOCIETY. 

OR
PAY ONLINE USING YOUR ATM CARD. IT IS SECURED AND RELIABLE.

Enter Amount

form>DELIVERY PERIOD FOR BANK PAYMENT IS  LESS THAN 24 HOURS

CALL OUR  CUSTOMERS CARE  OKEKE CHIDI C ON :  08074466939,08063386834.

AFTER PAYMENT SEND YOUR PAYMENT DETAILS TO

08074466939 or 08063386834, YOUR PROJECT TITLE  YOU WANT US TO SEND TO YOU, AMOUNT PAID, DEPOSITOR NAME, UR EMAIL ADDRESS,PAYMENT DATE. YOU WILL RECEIVE YOUR MATERIAL IN LESS THAN 2 HOURS ONCE WILL CONFIRM YOUR PAYMENT.

WE HAVE SECURITY IN OUR BUSINESS.   

MONEY BACK GUARANTEE

Share This:

“MARGARINE” PRODUCTION USING OIL BLENDS FROM PALM KERNEL, COCONUT AND MELON

“MARGARINE” PRODUCTION USING OIL BLENDS FROM PALM KERNEL, COCONUT AND MELON

ABSTRACT

 

Palm kernel, coconut and melon oils were extracted and refined. Their physical and chemical characteristics were examined. The refined oils were blended to produce three samples of margarine: palm kernel oil margarine (PKO), palm kernel and coconut oils margarine were tested for free fatty acid and Iodine value with the  following results 0.27,0.84, 1.68 Free Fatty Acid, 17.77, 20.30, 21.57 Iodine value for PKO, PCO and PCM margarine respectively. These products were assessed organoleptically using 9 – point hedoic scale o both samples and the standard were found to be significantly different at 5% level of probability.

There was however no significant difference in taste and colour at the same level of significance. Production of margarine using these three blends of oils should be encouraged to add to the varieties of margarine in the market.

CHAPTER ONE

  1. INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER TWO

  1. LITERATURE REVIEW
    • Fats and Oils
      • Importance of Fats and Oils
      • Fats as Food
      • Essential Fatty Acids
      • Classification of Fats and Oils
      • Composition of Seed Oils
      • Tropical Oil Seeds
    • Palm Kernel, Coconut and Melon
      • Coconut
      • Melon
      • General Methods of Extracting Seed Oils
      • Refining and Processing of Seed Oils
      • Hydrogenation
      • Storage of Processed Oil
      • Rancidity
      • Functions of Additives Used
      • Components Contributing Flavour and Colour
    • Margarine

 

CHAPTER THREE

  1. MATERIALS AND METHODS
  • Source of Material
    • Refining Procedure
  • Determination of the Specific Gravity
    • Determination of Yield
    • Determination of Moisture Content
  • Method of Chemical Analysis on the Oils
    • Provide Value Determination
    • Free Fatty Determination
    • Determination of Iodine Value
  • Recipe for the Product
  • Production of Margarine
  • Methods of Analysis of Margarine
  • Sensory Evaluation

 

CHAPTER FOUR

  • RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

4.1     Conclusion

  • Discussion

 

 

CHAPTER FIVE

  • CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION

5.1     Conclusion

  • Recommendation

References

Appendices

LIST OF TABLES

 

TABLE 1:   Classification of Vegetable Oils.

TABLE 2:   Chemical Composition of Palm Kernel Oil

TABLE 3

TABLE 4:   Formulation of Samples

TABLE 5:   Shows the Physical Analysis of the Oils

TABLE 6:   Chemical Analysis of the Oils

TABLE 7:   Chemical Analysis of the Margarine Samples

Production

TABLE 8:   L.S.D. Sensory Evaluation on the Margarine

Samples.

LIST OF FLOW CHART

 

FLOW CHART 1:                   Refining Process of Oil

 

FLOW CHART 2:                   Production Chart

 

FLOW CHART 3:                   Refining of Crude Oil

 

FLOW CHART 4:                   Production of Margarine

 


CHAPTER ONE

 

INTRODUCTION

Margarine, a butter substitute made originally from other animal fats, but nowadays exclusively from vegetable oils, like homogenization and pasteurization is a reach innovation. Margarine is made from water in oilemulsion because margarine is oilemulsion. Today it is a manufactured imitation of butter made by mixing a variety of fats that may include whale oil or vegetable oils, hydrogenated to an appropriates degree. Stabilize, an oil soluble dye and a proportion of soured skimmed milk to supply flavour.

Like its model, margarine is about 80% fat, 20% water and solids. It is flavoured, coloured ad fortified with vitamin A and sometimes D to match butters nutritional contribution. Single oil or a blend may be used. During World War 1, coconut oil was favoured, in the thirties, it was cottonseed, and in the fifties, soy. Today, soy and corn oils predominate. The raw oil is pressed from the seeds, purified, hydrogenated, them fortified and coloured, either with a synthetic carotene or with annatto, a pigment extracted from a tropical seed. The water phase is usually reconstituted or skim milk that is cultured with lactic bacteria to produce a stronger flavour although pure diacetyl, the compound most responsible for the flavour of butter, is also used. Emulsifiers such as lecithin help disperse the water phase evenly throughout the oil, salt and preservatives are also commonly added. The mixture of oil and water is them heated, blended, and cooled. The softer tub margarines are made with less hydrogenated, more liquid oils than other types of margarines.

In 1860s French Emperor Louis Napoleon III offered a prize to anyone who could make satisfactory substitutes for buffer, suitable for use by the armed forces and the lower classes.

French chemist Hippolyte Mege-Mouriezi invented a substance he called oleomargarine, which become, in shortened form, the trade name margarine and is now the generic term for a wide range of broadly similar edible oils. It is sometimes shortened to oleoleomargarine which was made by taking clarified beef fat, extracting the liquid portion under pressure, and then allowing it to solidify. When combined with butyrins and water, it made a cheap and more – or – less palatable butter substitute. Sold as margarine or under any of a host of other trade names, butter substitutes soon became big business but too late to help Mege-Mouriez. Although he expanded his initial manufacturing operation from France to the United States in 1873, he had little commercial success. By the end of the decade, however, artificial butters were on sale in both the old World and the new.

Margarine is naturally white or almost white; by forbidding the addition of artificial colouring agents, legislators found that they could keep margarine off kitchen tables. The bans became common place around the world and would endure for almost 100 years. It did not become legal to sell coloured margarine. In Australia, for example, until the 1960s.

In the mean time, margarine manufactures had made changes. Modern margarine can be made from any of a wide variety of animal or vegetable fats, and is often mixed with skim milk, salt and emulsifiers. Liquid fats are transformed into suitable substrates by the chemical process of hydrogenation, which renders them  solid at room temperature. Many popular table spreads today are blends of margarine and butter. Something that was long illegal in the United States and Australia and no doubt parts of the world too and are designed to combine and the lower cost and easy – spreading of  artificial butter with the taste of the real thing.

Three main types of margarine are common:

Hard, generally uncoloured margarine for cooking or baking, which contains a high proportion of animal fat. “Traditional” margarines for such use as spreading on toast, which contain a relatively high percentage of saturated fats and made from either animal or vegetable oils. Margarines high in mono – poly – unsaturated fats, which are made from safflower, sunflower soybean, cottonseed, or olive oil.

Margarine, particularly polyunsaturated margarine has become a major part of the Western dieted states, for example, in 1930 the average person ate over 8kg of butter a year and just over 1 kg of margarine By the and of the 20th century, an average American ate just under 2kg of butter and bearly 4kg of margarine.

Based on the fact  that margarine can be obtained from vegetable fat and animal fat, this study to produce margarine from palm kernel melon $ coconut oils bland id to investigate if the product would be preferred over the sample in the market by the consumers. The odour and taste in the oils would be removed during processing for it not to affect the sample of margarine.

Physical, chemical and sensory evaluation test would be employed to investigate the quality. With the results we will defer mine the degree of acceptance of the proudly by the consumers.

Download our android mobile app for more materials

ORDER NOW

COMPLETE MATERIAL  COST  N2,500 Or $10.  FRESH  PROJECT MATERIAL  COST 50,000 NAIRA FOR UNDERGRADUATE, OTHERS 100,000 -200,000 NAIRA.

THE NATURE AND CONSEQUENCES OF JUVENILE DELINQUENCY IN NIGERIA: A STUDY OF ENUGU NORTH LGA, ENUGU STATE

MAKE YOUR PAYMENT  INTO ANY OF THE FOLLOWING BANKS:
 GTBANK
Account Name : Host Link Global Services Ltd
ACCOUNT NUMBER: 0138924237
First Bank:
Account Name: Chi E-Concept Int’l
Account Name: 3059320631

Foreign Transaction For Dollars Payment :
Bank Name: GTBank
Branch Location: Enugu State,Nigeria.
Account Name: Chi E-Concept Int’l
 Account Number:  0117780667. 
Swift Code: GTBINGLA 
Dollar conversion rate for Naira is 175 per dollar. 

ATM CARD:  YOU CAN ALSO MAKE PAYMENT USING YOUR ATM CARD OR ONLINE TRANSFER. PLEASE CONTACT YOUR BANK SECURITY FOR GUIDE ON HOW TO TRANSFER MONEY TO OTHER BANKS USING YOUR ATM CARD. ATM CARD OR ONLINE BANK TRANSFER IS FASTER FOR QUICK DELIVERY TO YOUR EMAIL . OUR MARKETER WILL RESPOND TO YOU ANY TIME OF THE DAY. WE SUPPORT CBN CASHLESS SOCIETY. 

OR
PAY ONLINE USING YOUR ATM CARD. IT IS SECURED AND RELIABLE.

Enter Amount

form>DELIVERY PERIOD FOR BANK PAYMENT IS  LESS THAN 24 HOURS

CALL OUR  CUSTOMERS CARE  OKEKE CHIDI C ON :  08074466939,08063386834.

AFTER PAYMENT SEND YOUR PAYMENT DETAILS TO

08074466939 or 08063386834, YOUR PROJECT TITLE  YOU WANT US TO SEND TO YOU, AMOUNT PAID, DEPOSITOR NAME, UR EMAIL ADDRESS,PAYMENT DATE. YOU WILL RECEIVE YOUR MATERIAL IN LESS THAN 2 HOURS ONCE WILL CONFIRM YOUR PAYMENT.

WE HAVE SECURITY IN OUR BUSINESS.   

MONEY BACK GUARANTEE

Share This:

Food Science Project Topics

FOOD SCIENCE PROJECT TOPICS AND MATERIAL FOR STUDENTS

YOU CAN  REQUEST PREVIEW BEFORE PAYMENT.NOTE: OUR CASE STUDY CAN BE CHANGE TO SUIT YOUR HEART DESIRE. WE CAN RESEARCH ANY TOPIC OF YOUR CHOICE. YOUR PROJECT MATERIAL WILL BE SENT TO YOUR EMAIL IN LESS THAN 1 HOUR ONCE WE RECEIVE YOUR PAYMENT.

Click here to download our android mobile app to your phone  for more materials and others

                                   ORDER NOW

COMPLETE MATERIAL  COST  N2,500 Or $10.  FRESH  PROJECT MATERIAL  COST 50,000 NAIRA FOR UNDERGRADUATE, OTHERS 100,000 -200,000 NAIRA.

MAKE YOUR PAYMENT  INTO ANY OF THE FOLLOWING BANKS:
 GTBANK
Account Name : Host Link Global Services Ltd
ACCOUNT NUMBER: 0138924237
First Bank:
Account Name: Chi E-Concept Int’l
Account Name: 3059320631

Foreign Transaction For Dollars Payment :
Bank Name: GTBank
Branch Location: Enugu State,Nigeria.
Account Name: Chi E-Concept Int’l
 Account Number:  0117780667. 
Swift Code: GTBINGLA 
Dollar conversion rate for Naira is 175 per dollar. 

ATM CARD:  YOU CAN ALSO MAKE PAYMENT USING YOUR ATM CARD OR ONLINE TRANSFER. PLEASE CONTACT YOUR BANK SECURITY FOR GUIDE ON HOW TO TRANSFER MONEY TO OTHER BANKS USING YOUR ATM CARD. ATM CARD OR ONLINE BANK TRANSFER IS FASTER FOR QUICK DELIVERY TO YOUR EMAIL . OUR MARKETER WILL RESPOND TO YOU ANY TIME OF THE DAY. WE SUPPORT CBN CASHLESS SOCIETY. 

OR
PAY ONLINE USING YOUR ATM CARD. IT IS SECURED AND RELIABLE.

Enter Amount

form>DELIVERY PERIOD FOR BANK PAYMENT IS  LESS THAN 24 HOURS

CALL OUR  CUSTOMERS CARE  OKEKE CHIDI C ON :  08074466939,08063386834.

AFTER PAYMENT SEND YOUR PAYMENT DETAILS TO

08074466939 or 08063386834, YOUR PROJECT TITLE  YOU WANT US TO SEND TO YOU, AMOUNT PAID, DEPOSITOR NAME, UR EMAIL ADDRESS,PAYMENT DATE. YOU WILL RECEIVE YOUR MATERIAL IN LESS THAN 1 HOUR ONCE WILL CONFIRM YOUR PAYMENT.

WE HAVE SECURITY IN OUR BUSINESS.   

MONEY BACK GUARANTEE

WE GUARANTEE EXCELLENT RESULT IN YOUR PROJECT.

 

 

1. MARGARINE” PRODUCTION USING OIL BLENDS FROM PALM KERNEL, COCONUT AND MELON 2.  ADDITIVES AND PRESERVATIVES USED IN FOOD PROCESSING AND PRESERVATION AND THEIR HEALTH IMPLICATION. 3.  AN EPIDEMOLOGY SURVEY FOR SCTRISTOSOMIASIS AMONG PUPILS IN AMAGUNZE COMMUNITY IN NKANU LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA IN EENUGU 4.  AN INVESTIGATION ON THE EFFECT OF VARIOUS PACKAGING MATERIAL ON THE QUALITY ATTRIBUTES OF SUYA (MEAT) 5.  ANAEMIA IN PREGNANCY (A CASE STUDY OF PREGNANT WOMEN ATTENDING ANTENATAL CLINIC AT UNIVERISTY OF NIGERIA TEACHING HOSPITAL. (UNTH, ENUGU) 6.  ANALYSIS OF CONTAMINATION OF ALASA RIVER IN BURUTU LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA OF DELTA 7. ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF SWEET ORANGE (CITRUS SINENSIS) ON STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS AND ESCHERICHIA COLI ISOLATED FROM WOUND INFECTED 8. ASCARIASIS AMONG CHILDREN BETWEEN THE AGE OF 4-15 YEARS (A CASE STUDY OF SCHOOL I, II, III, IV IN ZIKS AVENUE PRIMARY SCHOOL UWANI ENUGU NIGERIA) 9. BACHERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF IDODO RIVER 10. BACTERIAL CONTAMINATS ASSOCIATED WITH COMMERCIAL POULTRY FEED FROM THREE DIFFERENT COMPANIES 11. BACTERIAL EXAMINATION OF SPOILT “EGUSI” SOUP 12. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF ANTIMICROBIAL STRENGTH OF THREE MOST COMMON ANTIBIOTICS USED IN ENUGU (CASE STUDY OF ANTIBIOTICS DRUGS BROUGHT IN OBIAGU.) 13. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF MICROBIAL LOAD OF THE ENUGU MAIN WATER PRODUCTION AND WATER AVAILABLE TO IMT CAMPUS II HOSTEL 14. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF PIPEBORNE WATER AND OTHER SOURCES OF WATER WITHIN ENUGU METROPOLIS (EMENE LOCALITY) 15. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE ASH AND MOISTURE CONTENT OF RIPED AND UNRIPED PLANTAIN (MUSA SPP) 16. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF MICRO-ORGANISM ASSOCIATED WITH THE SPOILAGE OF BANANA 17. CONSUMERS ACCEPTABILITY AND PHYSICO CHEMICAL QUALITY OF BREAKFAST FROM MALTED SORGHUM (Sorghum vulgarc var K.S.V.S) “ACHA” “(Digitaria exilib) AND CASSAVA (Manihot esculante) Starch. 18. DETERMINATION OF HYDROGEN CYANIDE IN CASSAVA 19. ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF SOME METHODS ADOPTED IN YOUGHOURT PRODUCTION 20. EFFECT OF STEEPING PERIOD ON YIELD AND ACCEPTABILITY OF STARCH EXTRACTED FROM SORGHUM (SORGHUM BICOLOR, WHITE VARIETY AND RED VARIETY) 21. EFFECT OF STORAGE TIME ON THE FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF WHEAT/BAMBKA GROUNDNUT BLEND 22. EVALUATION OF THE PERFORMANCE OF SECCHAROMYCES CEREVISAAE ISOLATE FROM PALM-WINE IN VINEGAR PRODUCTION FROM OR ANGE JUICE. 23. EVALUATION OF THE PERFORMANCE OF SECCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE ISOLATE FROM PALM-WINE IN VINEGAR PRODUCTION FROM OR ANGE JUICE. 24. EVALUATON OF CURRENT TECHNIQUES IN DIAGNOSES OF HUMAN IMMUNODAFICIENCY VIRUS (HIV) 25. EXAMINATION OF INCIDENCE OF MALARIA INFESTATION CAUSED BY DIFFERNET SPECIES OF PLASMODIUM IN ENUGU METROPOLIC (A CASE STUDY OF PARKLANE HOSPITAL ENUGU) 26. EXAMINATION OF JOLLOF RICE SERVED IN HOTELS FOR PATHOGENIC ORGANISMS 27. EXAMINATION OF STOOL FOR THE PRESENCE OF FELMINETH USING DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES (A CASE STUDY OF ENUGU EAST LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA ENUGU) 28. EXTRACTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF FATTY ACIDS IN MAIZE (ZEA MAYS) 29. EXTRACTION OF CASHEW NUT SEED OIL AND ITS EFFECT ON COLI FORM 30. FERMENTATIVE PRODUCTION OF CASSAVA FLOUR FOR BAKERY INDUSTRIES 31. FOOD IN – RELATION TO DISEASES 32. FOOD IRRATION IN NIGERIA (PROSPECTS AND PROBLEMS) 33. FUNGAL INFUSTATION ON BAKERY PRODUCT DREAM 34. GASTROENTERITIS IN PRIMARY SCHOOL CHIDREN IN ENUGU METROPOLIS (6-12 YRS) 35. IDENTIFICATION OF FUNGI ASSOCIATED WITH TEA SPOILAGE OF SWEET POTATO TUBERS SOLD AT OGBETE MAIN MARKET IN ENUGU, ENUGU NORTH LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA. ENUGU STATE 36. IDENTIFICATION OF FUNGI ASSOCIATED WITH THE SPOILAGE OF SWEET POTATO TUBERS SOLD AT OGBETE MAIN MARKET IN ENUGU, ENUGU NORTH LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA. ENUGU STATE 37. INCIDENCE OF VAGINAL CANDIDACIES AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN AN PARK-LANE, HOSPITAL, A CASE STUDY OF PREGNANT WOMEN ATTENDING ANTENATAL CLINK AT PARK-LINE ENUGU. 38. INVESTIGATE THE MICROBIAL CONTENT OF SOME BOLTED SOFT DRIVELS SOLD IN ENUGU INTERLOPES 39. INVESTIGATION OF THE PRODUCTION OF A GOOD QUALITY ETHANOL FROM LOCAL RAW MATERIAL (CASSAVA) USING MICRO-ORGANISM WITHIN OUR LOCALITY. 40. INVITRO DETERMINATION OF BACTERIOCIDAL EFFECT OF GARLIC ON STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS 41. ISOLATIOIN AND CHARACTERISATION OF BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH HAWKED SUYA- MEAT (CASE STUDY OF ENUGU). 42. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROORGANISMS FROM STORED PAP (OGI) 43. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MOULD ASSIOCATED IN THE SPOILAGE OF BREAD 44. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF TINEA CAPTIS FROM HAIR BARBING EQUIPMENT IN ENUGU METROPOLIS 45. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH WOUND SEPSIS 46. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN HOTEL SWIMMING POOL IN ENUGU URBAN

47. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS ASSOCIATED IN CONTAMINATED “OKPA” (BAMBARA GROUNDNUT) VOUNDZIES SUBTERENEA 48. ISOLATION AND PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE FROM ON PALM WINE (ELAELS GUINNEENSIS) AT DIFFERENT TEMPERATURE OF PROOFING DURING BREAD MAKING 49. MAIZE ADJUNCT IN SORGHUM BEER BREWING 50. MALARIA PARASITE AND ITS EFFECT TO HUMAN HEALTH (A CASE STUDY OF UNTH ENUGU) 51. METHODS OF PROCESSING YAM 52. MICOROBIAL EXAMINATION OF FRIED RICE SOLD IN FAST FOOD JOINTS (A CASE STUDY OF MR BIGGS, OKPARA AVENUE ENUGU) 53. MICROBIAL EXAMINATION OF BACTERIA IN BEEF SOLD IN ARTISAN MARKET ENUGU METROPOLIS 54. MICROBIAL EXAMINATION OF PATHOGENIC BACTERIA IN RAW MILK SAMPLE FROM A DIARY FARM (A CASE STUDY OF FULANI CATTLE SETTLEMENT IN EMENE, ENUGU, ENUGU STATE) 55. MICROBIAL EXAMINATION OF SPOILT AVOCADO FRUIT 56. MICROBIAL FOOD SPOILAGE AND ITS CONTROL 57. MICROBIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF BACTERIA IN TAPIOCA SOLD IN INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY ENUGU 58. MICROBIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF POWDERED TOBACCO SOLD IN ENUGU URBAN FOR THE PRESENCE OF PATHOGENIC BACTERIA 59. MICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY ON SPOILAGE OF MANGO FRUIT 60. MICROOBIAL EVALUATION OF RAM MILK FROM A DIARY FARM 61. ONION IS ASSOCIATED WITH MICRO-ORGANISMS WHICH ARE CAPABLE OF CAUSING SPOILAGE. 62. PHYSICO – CHEMICAL AND ORGANOLEPTICPROPERTIES OF FLOUR AND FUFU PROCESSE FROM CASSAVE VERIETIES. 63. PREVALENCE OF BACTERIAL GASTROENTERITIS AMONG CHILDREN AGED 0 – 15 YEARS (A CASE STUDY OF UNTH) 64. PREVALENCE OF ENTAMOEBA HISTOLYTICA IN ENUGU METROPOLIS A CASE STUDY OF PARKLANE HOSIPITAL ENUGU 65. PREVALENCE OF MALARIA PARASITE AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN (A CASE STUDY OF NIGER FOUNDATION HOSPITAL ENUGU) 66. PREVALENCE STUDY OF HEPATITIS B (AUSTRALIAN ANTIGEN) AMONG PATIENT IN NATIONAL ORTHOPEDIAE HOSPITAL ENUGU 67. PROCESS FOR REFINING VEGETABLE OIL AND ITS FOOD VALUE 68. PRODUCTION AND ACCEPTABILITY STUDIES OF MALTED SORGHUM (SORGHUM BICOLOR) BISCUIT 69. PRODUCTION OF “OGIRI” FROM SOYABEAN USING MICRO ORGANISM RESPONSIBLE FOR FERMENTATION OF CASTOR BEANS SEED “OGIRI” (COMMERCIAL “OGIRI”) 70. PRODUCTION OF ANTIFOAMING AGENT USING PALM KERNEL OIL 71. PRODUCTION OF BLEACH SOLUTION AND COMPARATIVE STUDY OF COMMERCIALLY PRODUCED BLEACH SOLUTION 72. PRODUCTION OF BREAD USING LACTIC ACID BACTERIAL (LAB) AND SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE (BAKERS YEAST) 73. PRODUCTION OF DEODORANT (AIR REFRESHING) FROM LOCAL PLANT MATERIALS.

74. PRODUCTION OF MIXED FRUIT USING FUSE LOCALLY SOURED CITRUS FRUITS ORANGE (CITRUS SILENCES) TANGERINE CITRUS RETICULATE) LEMON C GROUPS (CITRUS PARADOX)

Read more: Latest on Food Science project sample

75. PRODUCTION OF STARCH-BASED ADHESIVE FROM CASSAVA

76. PRODUCTION OF SUGAR SYRUPS (MOLASSES) FROM CANE SUGAR STICKS

77. PROMOTE COMPOSITION OF PLEUROTUS TUBERRCOGININ FROM ENUGU AREA.

78. PROXIMATE ANALYSIS OF SENSORY EVALUATION OF DRIED ONION (ALLIUM CEPA)

79. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AGE, FEEDING AND ANAEMIA IN PREGNANCY (A CASE STUDY OF PREGNANT WOMEN ATTENDING ANTENATAL CLINIC AT UNIVERSITY OF NIGERIA TEACHING HOSPITAL (UNTH) ENUGU)

80. THE ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF THREE TYPES OF MEDICATED SOAPS ON STARHYROCOCCUS AUREUS FORM WOULD INFECTIONS

81. THE DETERMINATION OF THE ACTIVITIES AND SPECIFICITY OF ENZYMES IN FERMENTATION OF STARCH – FROM MAIZE 82. THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT CONCENTRATIONS OF CITRIC ACID ON THE PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF ORANGE JUICE (CITRUS SINENSIS)

83. THE EFFECT OF FOOD PACKAGING MATERIAL ON THE ENVIRONMENT

84. THE EFFECT OF OIL SPILLAGE ON SOIL PROPERTIES AND CROP PERFORMANCE IN WARRI AREA

85. THE EFFECT OF PESTICIDES DICHLORODIPHENYL TRICHLOROEYHANE (D.D.Y) AND BENZENE HEXACHRORIDE (BHC) ON THE MICROFLORA OF THE THREE TYPES OF SOIL 86. THE EFFECT OF PROCESSING ON AFZELIA AFRICANA (AKPALATA) AND BRACHYSTEGIA SPP FLOUR AS SOUP THICKNER

87. THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT PROCESSIGN TECHNIQUIES ON THE ORGANOLEPTIC QUALITY OF SOYMILK PROCESSING AND STORAGE

88. THE EVALUATION OF MICROORGANISMS ON GARRI AT OGBETE MARKET

89. THE INCCIDENCE OF CANDIDIASIS AMONG SINGLE AND MARRIED WOMEN OF DIFFERENT AGE GROUP (CASE STUDY, UNTH ENUGU)

90. THE INCIDENCE OF HOOKWORM (ANCYLASTOMA DUODENALE) IN STOOLS OF PUPILS IN PRIMARY SCHOOLS IN ENUGU – EAST L.G.A OF ENUGU STATE

91. THE INCIDENCE OF SALMONELLA AND ESCHERCHIA COLI IN LIVESTOCK (POULTRY) FEEDS

92. THE INFLUENCE OF PROCESSING METHODS ON THE PROTEIN AND CYANIDE CONTENT OF AFRICAN YAM BEAN (Sphenostylis Stenocarpa)

93. THE MICROBIOLOGICAL QUALITY CONTROL OF SOYMILK BEVERAGE SOLD IN INSITITUE OF MANGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY CAMPUS 3 ENUGU.

94. THE PEEVALENCE OF STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE IN PNEUMONIA PTIENTS IN ENUGU METROPOLI

(A CASE STUDY OF UNTH ENUGU)

95. THE PHYSICO-CHEMICAL AND ANTIOXIDANT PROPERTIES OF CULINARY HERBS AND LOCAL SPIES PIPE GUIEENSE (UZIZA) XYLPIA AETHPICA (UDA), MONODORA MYRISTICA (EHURU), TETRAPELURA TETRAPTERA (OSHOSHO).

96. THE PREVALENCE OF TRICHOMONA VAGINALIS AMONG ADULTS IN “OSUMENYI” IN NNEWI SOUTH LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA ANAMBRA STATE

97. THE ROLE OF PACKAGING IN FOOD PROCESSING

98. THE STATUS OF PROCESSING AND PRESERVATION OF CEREALS IN NIGERIA

99. THE SURVEY OF THE MICROBIAL FLOAR OF COMMON (Achatina achatina) IN VIEW OF IDENTIFYING THE HUMAN PATHOGENIC ORGANISMS IN SNAIL

100. THE UTILITY POTENTIALS OF SOME DIOSCOREA SPECIES WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO D. ROTORIDATA AND D. DUMATORUM

101. USE OF COMPOSITE FLOUR BLENDS FOR BISCUIT MAKING (PEANUT/CASSAVA

102. EFFECT OF HEAT PROCESSING ON FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF ACHI FLOUR.

103. A STUDY ON THE EFFECT OF SECTIONING AND HEAT TREATMENT ON THE PHYSIO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF LOCAL BANANA

104. MICROBIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF POULTRY FEED AND DROPPINGS

105. QUALITY CHANGES OF MILK ANALOGUE PRODUCED FROM TIGERNUTS AND COCONUT EXTRACTS BLEND DURING AMBIENT AND COLD STORAGE

106. EVALUATION OF PROXIMATE COMPOSITIONS AND FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF AFRICAN APPLE STAR [CHRYSOPHYLLUM ALBIDUM]

107. SEEDS FLOUR UTILIZATION OF WALNUT EXTRACT IN THE PRODUCTION OF JUICE

108. COMPARATIVE STUDIES OF OGIRI PRODUCTION FROM OIL BEAN (UGBA), MELON (EGUSI) AND FRUITED PUMPKIN

109. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF PUMPKIN SEED (CUCURBITA PEPO)

110. PROXIMATE COMPOSITION AND SENSORY CHARACTERISTICS OF BISCUIT FROM WHEAT AND INFANT DEFATTED AFRICAN PEAR COMPOSITE

111. EFFECT OF PROCESSING ON THE RESIDUAL HEMGLUTENIN IN DEFATTED SOYBEAN FLOUR

Share This:

Food Science Project Topics And Materials For Students

FOOD SCIENCE PROJECT TOPICS AND MATERIAL FOR STUDENTS

COMPLETE PROJECT MATERIAL FOR FOOD SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY STUDENTS COST 5,000 NAIRA OR $30. WE CAN PROVIDE PREVIEW OF ANY TOPIC YOU CHOOSE BEFORE PAYMENT.NOTE: OUR CASE STUDY CAN BE CHANGE TO SUIT YOUR HEART DESIRE. WE CAN RESEARCH ANY TOPIC OF YOUR CHOICE. YOUR PROJECT MATERIAL WILL BE SENT TO YOUR EMAIL IN LESS THAN 24HOUR ONCE WE RECEIVE YOUR PAYMENT. A FRESH TOPICS NOT LISTED BELOW COST 20,000 NAIRA OR $115. BUY NOW

WE GUARANTEE EXCELLENT RESULT IN YOUR PROJECT.

1. MARGARINE” PRODUCTION USING OIL BLENDS FROM PALM KERNEL, COCONUT AND MELON
2.  ADDITIVES AND PRESERVATIVES USED IN FOOD PROCESSING AND PRESERVATION AND THEIR HEALTH IMPLICATION.
3.  AN EPIDEMOLOGY SURVEY FOR SCTRISTOSOMIASIS AMONG PUPILS IN AMAGUNZE COMMUNITY IN NKANU LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA IN EENUGU
4.  AN INVESTIGATION ON THE EFFECT OF VARIOUS PACKAGING MATERIAL ON THE QUALITY ATTRIBUTES OF SUYA (MEAT)
5.  ANAEMIA IN PREGNANCY (A CASE STUDY OF PREGNANT WOMEN ATTENDING ANTENATAL CLINIC AT UNIVERISTY OF NIGERIA TEACHING HOSPITAL. (UNTH, ENUGU)
6.  ANALYSIS OF CONTAMINATION OF ALASA RIVER IN BURUTU LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA OF DELTA
7. ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF SWEET ORANGE (CITRUS SINENSIS) ON STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS AND ESCHERICHIA COLI ISOLATED FROM WOUND INFECTED
8. ASCARIASIS AMONG CHILDREN BETWEEN THE AGE OF 4-15 YEARS (A CASE STUDY OF SCHOOL I, II, III, IV IN ZIKS AVENUE PRIMARY SCHOOL UWANI ENUGU NIGERIA)
9. BACHERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF IDODO RIVER
10. BACTERIAL CONTAMINATS ASSOCIATED WITH COMMERCIAL POULTRY FEED FROM THREE DIFFERENT COMPANIES
11. BACTERIAL EXAMINATION OF SPOILT “EGUSI” SOUP
12. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF ANTIMICROBIAL STRENGTH OF THREE MOST COMMON ANTIBIOTICS USED IN ENUGU (CASE STUDY OF ANTIBIOTICS DRUGS BROUGHT IN OBIAGU.)
13. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF MICROBIAL LOAD OF THE ENUGU MAIN WATER PRODUCTION AND WATER AVAILABLE TO IMT CAMPUS II HOSTEL
14. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF PIPEBORNE WATER AND OTHER SOURCES OF WATER WITHIN ENUGU METROPOLIS (EMENE LOCALITY)
15. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE ASH AND MOISTURE CONTENT OF RIPED AND UNRIPED PLANTAIN (MUSA SPP)
16. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF MICRO-ORGANISM ASSOCIATED WITH THE SPOILAGE OF BANANA
17. CONSUMERS ACCEPTABILITY AND PHYSICO CHEMICAL QUALITY OF BREAKFAST FROM MALTED SORGHUM (Sorghum vulgarc var K.S.V.S) “ACHA” “(Digitaria exilib) AND CASSAVA (Manihot esculante) Starch.
18. DETERMINATION OF HYDROGEN CYANIDE IN CASSAVA
19. ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF SOME METHODS ADOPTED IN YOUGHOURT PRODUCTION
20. EFFECT OF STEEPING PERIOD ON YIELD AND ACCEPTABILITY OF STARCH EXTRACTED FROM SORGHUM (SORGHUM BICOLOR, WHITE VARIETY AND RED VARIETY)
21. EFFECT OF STORAGE TIME ON THE FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF WHEAT/BAMBKA GROUNDNUT BLEND
22. EVALUATION OF THE PERFORMANCE OF SECCHAROMYCES CEREVISAAE ISOLATE FROM PALM-WINE IN VINEGAR PRODUCTION FROM OR ANGE JUICE.
23. EVALUATION OF THE PERFORMANCE OF SECCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE ISOLATE FROM PALM-WINE IN VINEGAR PRODUCTION FROM OR ANGE JUICE.
24. EVALUATON OF CURRENT TECHNIQUES IN DIAGNOSES OF HUMAN IMMUNODAFICIENCY VIRUS (HIV)
25. EXAMINATION OF INCIDENCE OF MALARIA INFESTATION CAUSED BY DIFFERNET SPECIES OF PLASMODIUM IN ENUGU METROPOLIC (A CASE STUDY OF PARKLANE HOSPITAL ENUGU)
26. EXAMINATION OF JOLLOF RICE SERVED IN HOTELS FOR PATHOGENIC ORGANISMS
27. EXAMINATION OF STOOL FOR THE PRESENCE OF FELMINETH USING DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES (A CASE STUDY OF ENUGU EAST LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA ENUGU)
28. EXTRACTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF FATTY ACIDS IN MAIZE (ZEA MAYS)
29. EXTRACTION OF CASHEW NUT SEED OIL AND ITS EFFECT ON COLI FORM
30. FERMENTATIVE PRODUCTION OF CASSAVA FLOUR FOR BAKERY INDUSTRIES
31. FOOD IN – RELATION TO DISEASES
32. FOOD IRRATION IN NIGERIA (PROSPECTS AND PROBLEMS)
33. FUNGAL INFUSTATION ON BAKERY PRODUCT DREAM
34. GASTROENTERITIS IN PRIMARY SCHOOL CHIDREN IN ENUGU METROPOLIS (6-12 YRS)
35. IDENTIFICATION OF FUNGI ASSOCIATED WITH TEA SPOILAGE OF SWEET POTATO TUBERS SOLD AT OGBETE MAIN MARKET IN ENUGU, ENUGU NORTH LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA. ENUGU STATE
36. IDENTIFICATION OF FUNGI ASSOCIATED WITH THE SPOILAGE OF SWEET POTATO TUBERS SOLD AT OGBETE MAIN MARKET IN ENUGU, ENUGU NORTH LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA. ENUGU STATE
37. INCIDENCE OF VAGINAL CANDIDACIES AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN AN PARK-LANE, HOSPITAL, A CASE STUDY OF PREGNANT WOMEN ATTENDING ANTENATAL CLINK AT PARK-LINE ENUGU.
38. INVESTIGATE THE MICROBIAL CONTENT OF SOME BOLTED SOFT DRIVELS SOLD IN ENUGU INTERLOPES
39. INVESTIGATION OF THE PRODUCTION OF A GOOD QUALITY ETHANOL FROM LOCAL RAW MATERIAL (CASSAVA) USING MICRO-ORGANISM WITHIN OUR LOCALITY.
40. INVITRO DETERMINATION OF BACTERIOCIDAL EFFECT OF GARLIC ON STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS
41. ISOLATIOIN AND CHARACTERISATION OF BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH HAWKED SUYA- MEAT (CASE STUDY OF ENUGU).
42. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROORGANISMS FROM STORED PAP (OGI)
43. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MOULD ASSIOCATED IN THE SPOILAGE OF BREAD
44. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF TINEA CAPTIS FROM HAIR BARBING EQUIPMENT IN ENUGU METROPOLIS
45. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH WOUND SEPSIS
46. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN HOTEL SWIMMING POOL IN ENUGU URBAN

47. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS ASSOCIATED IN CONTAMINATED “OKPA” (BAMBARA GROUNDNUT) VOUNDZIES SUBTERENEA
48. ISOLATION AND PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE FROM ON PALM WINE (ELAELS GUINNEENSIS) AT DIFFERENT TEMPERATURE OF PROOFING DURING BREAD MAKING
49. MAIZE ADJUNCT IN SORGHUM BEER BREWING
50. MALARIA PARASITE AND ITS EFFECT TO HUMAN HEALTH (A CASE STUDY OF UNTH ENUGU)
51. METHODS OF PROCESSING YAM
52. MICOROBIAL EXAMINATION OF FRIED RICE SOLD IN FAST FOOD JOINTS (A CASE STUDY OF MR BIGGS, OKPARA AVENUE ENUGU)
53. MICROBIAL EXAMINATION OF BACTERIA IN BEEF SOLD IN ARTISAN MARKET ENUGU METROPOLIS
54. MICROBIAL EXAMINATION OF PATHOGENIC BACTERIA IN RAW MILK SAMPLE FROM A DIARY FARM (A CASE STUDY OF FULANI CATTLE SETTLEMENT IN EMENE, ENUGU, ENUGU STATE)
55. MICROBIAL EXAMINATION OF SPOILT AVOCADO FRUIT
56. MICROBIAL FOOD SPOILAGE AND ITS CONTROL
57. MICROBIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF BACTERIA IN TAPIOCA SOLD IN INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY ENUGU
58. MICROBIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF POWDERED TOBACCO SOLD IN ENUGU URBAN FOR THE PRESENCE OF PATHOGENIC BACTERIA
59. MICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY ON SPOILAGE OF MANGO FRUIT
60. MICROOBIAL EVALUATION OF RAM MILK FROM A DIARY FARM
61. ONION IS ASSOCIATED WITH MICRO-ORGANISMS WHICH ARE CAPABLE OF CAUSING SPOILAGE.
62. PHYSICO – CHEMICAL AND ORGANOLEPTICPROPERTIES OF FLOUR AND FUFU PROCESSE FROM CASSAVE VERIETIES.
63. PREVALENCE OF BACTERIAL GASTROENTERITIS AMONG CHILDREN AGED 0 – 15 YEARS (A CASE STUDY OF UNTH)
64. PREVALENCE OF ENTAMOEBA HISTOLYTICA IN ENUGU METROPOLIS A CASE STUDY OF PARKLANE HOSIPITAL ENUGU
65. PREVALENCE OF MALARIA PARASITE AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN (A CASE STUDY OF NIGER FOUNDATION HOSPITAL ENUGU)
66. PREVALENCE STUDY OF HEPATITIS B (AUSTRALIAN ANTIGEN) AMONG PATIENT IN NATIONAL ORTHOPEDIAE HOSPITAL ENUGU
67. PROCESS FOR REFINING VEGETABLE OIL AND ITS FOOD VALUE
68. PRODUCTION AND ACCEPTABILITY STUDIES OF MALTED SORGHUM (SORGHUM BICOLOR) BISCUIT
69. PRODUCTION OF “OGIRI” FROM SOYABEAN USING MICRO ORGANISM RESPONSIBLE FOR FERMENTATION OF CASTOR BEANS SEED “OGIRI” (COMMERCIAL “OGIRI”)
70. PRODUCTION OF ANTIFOAMING AGENT USING PALM KERNEL OIL
71. PRODUCTION OF BLEACH SOLUTION AND COMPARATIVE STUDY OF COMMERCIALLY PRODUCED BLEACH SOLUTION
72. PRODUCTION OF BREAD USING LACTIC ACID BACTERIAL (LAB) AND SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE (BAKERS YEAST)
73. PRODUCTION OF DEODORANT (AIR REFRESHING) FROM LOCAL PLANT MATERIALS.
74. PRODUCTION OF MIXED FRUIT USING FUSE LOCALLY SOURED CITRUS FRUITS ORANGE (CITRUS SILENCES) TANGERINE CITRUS RETICULATE) LEMON C GROUPS (CITRUS PARADOX)
75. PRODUCTION OF STARCH-BASED ADHESIVE FROM CASSAVA
76. PRODUCTION OF SUGAR SYRUPS (MOLASSES) FROM CANE SUGAR STICKS
77. PROMOTE COMPOSITION OF PLEUROTUS TUBERRCOGININ FROM ENUGU AREA.
78. PROXIMATE ANALYSIS OF SENSORY EVALUATION OF DRIED ONION (ALLIUM CEPA)
79. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AGE, FEEDING AND ANAEMIA IN PREGNANCY (A CASE STUDY OF PREGNANT WOMEN ATTENDING ANTENATAL CLINIC AT UNIVERSITY OF NIGERIA TEACHING HOSPITAL (UNTH) ENUGU)
80. THE ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF THREE TYPES OF MEDICATED SOAPS ON STARHYROCOCCUS AUREUS FORM WOULD INFECTIONS
81. THE DETERMINATION OF THE ACTIVITIES AND SPECIFICITY OF ENZYMES IN FERMENTATION OF STARCH – FROM MAIZE
82. THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT CONCENTRATIONS OF CITRIC ACID ON THE PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF ORANGE JUICE (CITRUS SINENSIS)
83. THE EFFECT OF FOOD PACKAGING MATERIAL ON THE ENVIRONMENT
84. THE EFFECT OF OIL SPILLAGE ON SOIL PROPERTIES AND CROP PERFORMANCE IN WARRI AREA
85. THE EFFECT OF PESTICIDES DICHLORODIPHENYL TRICHLOROEYHANE (D.D.Y) AND BENZENE HEXACHRORIDE (BHC) ON THE MICROFLORA OF THE THREE TYPES OF SOIL
86. THE EFFECT OF PROCESSING ON AFZELIA AFRICANA (AKPALATA) AND BRACHYSTEGIA SPP FLOUR AS SOUP THICKNER
87. THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT PROCESSIGN TECHNIQUIES ON THE ORGANOLEPTIC QUALITY OF SOYMILK PROCESSING AND STORAGE
88. THE EVALUATION OF MICROORGANISMS ON GARRI AT OGBETE MARKET
89. THE INCCIDENCE OF CANDIDIASIS AMONG SINGLE AND MARRIED WOMEN OF DIFFERENT AGE GROUP (CASE STUDY, UNTH ENUGU)
90. THE INCIDENCE OF HOOKWORM (ANCYLASTOMA DUODENALE) IN STOOLS OF PUPILS IN PRIMARY SCHOOLS IN ENUGU – EAST L.G.A OF ENUGU STATE
91. THE INCIDENCE OF SALMONELLA AND ESCHERCHIA COLI IN LIVESTOCK (POULTRY) FEEDS
92. THE INFLUENCE OF PROCESSING METHODS ON THE PROTEIN AND CYANIDE CONTENT OF AFRICAN YAM BEAN (Sphenostylis Stenocarpa)
93. THE MICROBIOLOGICAL QUALITY CONTROL OF SOYMILK BEVERAGE SOLD IN INSITITUE OF MANGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY CAMPUS 3 ENUGU.
94. THE PEEVALENCE OF STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE IN PNEUMONIA PTIENTS IN ENUGU METROPOLI (A CASE STUDY OF UNTH ENUGU)
95. THE PHYSICO-CHEMICAL AND ANTIOXIDANT PROPERTIES OF CULINARY HERBS AND LOCAL SPIES PIPE GUIEENSE (UZIZA) XYLPIA AETHPICA (UDA), MONODORA MYRISTICA (EHURU), TETRAPELURA TETRAPTERA (OSHOSHO).
96. THE PREVALENCE OF TRICHOMONA VAGINALIS AMONG ADULTS IN “OSUMENYI” IN NNEWI SOUTH LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA ANAMBRA STATE
97. THE ROLE OF PACKAGING IN FOOD PROCESSING
98. THE STATUS OF PROCESSING AND PRESERVATION OF CEREALS IN NIGERIA
99. THE SURVEY OF THE MICROBIAL FLOAR OF COMMON (Achatina achatina) IN VIEW OF IDENTIFYING THE HUMAN PATHOGENIC ORGANISMS IN SNAIL
100. THE UTILITY POTENTIALS OF SOME DIOSCOREA SPECIES WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO D. ROTORIDATA AND D. DUMATORUM
101. USE OF COMPOSITE FLOUR BLENDS FOR BISCUIT MAKING (PEANUT/CASSAVA

Share This: